Forest and Waterfalls

Forest and Waterfalls – a Natural Delight

Diva Livingston

November 30, 2012

The palest of winter skies reflected soothingly in her eyes and the woman’s introspective gaze altered as she stepped from the fertile forest into a clearing to continue on a well-worn foot path with its puddles and high ground littered with gravel. The northwest sky typical at this time of year was gray and heavy with clouds that moved ever so slightly. A breeze felt miles below caused the physically fit woman to look up in the event it darkened with the advance of rain. The pensive mood which occupied her wandering senses while among the magnificent trees changed to keen observation upon entering a meadow with its grasses and shrubs. Might there be plant material to gather?  A few days ago while reading a book about floral arrangements, her interest was piqued in the discovery of a Japanese designer who used only foliage, no flowers in his arrangements. This could be a possibility in all seasons then, she sagely mused.

A favorite season of this wayfinder was spring because of the newness of life that comes forth from the earth with a variety of colors, textures and shapes, and the pungent smells of nature. It was a playful time with scurrying and leaping of lively insects and furry creatures — a time of wonder. Whenever the adventuress was  alone in the forest or in other natural environments, she was attuned toward a contemplative mood more so than what seemed to be revealed in most people. Then again, the lone hiker determined with a smile, she wasn’t like most people. Most people wouldn’t notice the shade of green in grasses that changed with the seasons or the rocks that glistened in the stream but were not so vibrant once dried and lying on a sandy bank. The “not so pretty any more rocks” made fascinating miniature Stonehenge creations where balancing the stones was a fun, idyllic activity. The woman made them when she went out on walks and noticed that adults and children made them too. There must be something magical in the pensive ritual that keep people’s interest in doing such a task. Maybe this was the key – simplicity in a multi-task, time line driven, hurry-to-the-next-thing, and far too distracted world of automatrons.

Water saved the woman from being an automatron.  The magnificent waterfalls close to the Columbia River Gorge, where she had been living only a few months, were indeed salvation to her soul. Getting to them required a more invigorating walk but was entirely worth it. It was peaceful and an enjoyable realization to be removed from bustle of the city, even with its delightful activities, she readily determined. Renewed and with a creative mindset, she advanced with her camera toward the cascading waterfalls. Voluminous water pummeled over the peaks and bounced against the ground with fierce velocity invigorating her. It was almost unbelievable and incredibly fascinating to watch. This cost-free entertainment could be enjoyed by anyone willing to take a hike. With a trained eye for photography and composition, she moved her body — bending down and climbing up, to the left or the right — peering through the lens and wiping it dry, after a few seconds, as  the water lightly sprayed her face. This was what she loved — Aliveness! A superior moment brought by an adventurous walk and an open-minded attitude toward the possibility of all seasons having something to offer to those who sought joyousness in nature.

 

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Diva Livingston, Photographer – Oregon, USA

Watermark (#3 image) Photoshop enhancement  by Jon  Livingston

Please ask for use permission!